Children's Book Clubs Are A Consortium of Sorts For all Kinds of Readers

That's what makes them interesting.

#children #bookclubsforchildren #raisingreaders #youngreadersclub #books #bookclubs


Everyone of us is beautiful and different in many ways. Imagine what it would be like if we get together to read and discuss books? Would we all see the book in the same way?

One of the batches at the Young Readers' Club, is currently reading a book that can be challenging at times. The author purposefully deviates us from the main plot. While there are readers who want to be patient and give the book a chance as we uncover layer by layer, there are others who are growing impatient. Nevertheless, the group interaction has enabled everyone of them to come up with theories about the story and what keeps them going is the curiosity about whose theory is likely to be right. Whether this book would get the same amount of attention had it been read individually, is perhaps easy to say- chances are that many kids wouldn't have the patience to sit through it by themselves unless they are avid readers who don't give up that easily.


Book clubs bring forth the benefit of cohort learning and collaboration

Enforcing the fact as a reader one is not alone in facing the challenges that some books offer and the idea that we can support one another making it a lot easier and enjoyable is something that book clubs help deliver. Also, reading as an activity becomes one of sharing ideas/thoughts freely.


Book clubs enable children to realise that their way of perceiving a book may be very different from others. A book that they love may not be preferred by another child. Knowing why that's the case helps with the realisation that all of us have different likes and that is ok. There may be times when this isn't necessarily true. When children find other readers of their age who share their preferences in terms of books, a magical bond begins and eventually they motivate one another to pursue reading more actively. Every day is a new day at the book club.



A book that they love may not be preferred by another child. Knowing why that's the case helps with the realisation that all of us have different likes and that is ok. There may be times when this isn't necessarily true. When children find other readers of their age who share their preferences in terms of books, a magical bond begins and eventually they motivate one another to pursue reading more actively.

There are different sorts of book clubs. Some book clubs have the facilitator select a book that everyone would read. These may be genre specific and those who join are interested in that genre. The format could be either reading the book during the meet and discussing it or members are expected to read the book and come 'prepared' for the meeting and share their views. Other book clubs may have a lot more options and may not be genre specific.


Does it have to be offline? Do virtual book clubs work?

Offline could work beautifully, if everyone has access to the same book. This may mean everyone buying a copy of the book, which is great if everyone is willing to go that extra mile every month. It feels good to feel the book as book lovers who hate the kindle would say. But if you are the kinds who has run out of space for books buying a copy of a new book every month may not be ideal.


Virtual book clubs help pave the way for a lot of flexibility. For starters, it isn't absolutely necessary for all the members to have a copy of the book. That saves space and money for the members. Plus a huge advantage is that if a particular book is not able to hold the attention of the members for long for a variety of reasons, it is possible to abandon the book instead of forcing them to read something that simply isn't resonating with them.


There is room to get a little creative too. You could conduct fun book parties in which children are allowed to use a variety of virtual backgrounds and filters to create a sense of celebration. Even better, when you don't have to plan pick up and drop. Reading with peers is a just a click away.


“We read to know that we are not alone.” —S. Lewis

 

If you enjoyed reading this article, click on the button below to stay informed.



 

Both weekday and weekend batches are available at the Young Readers' Club. While this program is for the 8-11 age group, the Young Writers' Club program for the 12-14 age group offers a weekly platform to read and discuss curated articles from the news, observe writing approaches and practise one's writing skills.

Need more information? Please fill in the contact form below and we will reach out to you asap.

15 views0 comments