Speaking About A Crystal Flute From 1813

Updated: Oct 28

The news doesn't always have to be disturbing. There can be news that could make you stop in your tracks, become curious.


#writing #reading #speaking #groupdiscussions #freeexpression #thinking #news #teens #history #music



Lizzo practices with James Madison’s flute, before bringing it onstage during her concert at Capital One Arena in Washington.Credit.Shawn Miller/Library of Congress


 

“Seems like a glass flute.”

“She looks confident.”

“Do you think she is an expert?”

“No, somehow I feel that she is not expert. Can’t say why though.”

“She must definitely be an expert. Otherwise she wouldn’t be playing in the Capital One Arena.”

“Who is James Madison and why is she playing his flute?”

“It looks brittle and seems odd.”

A picture alone can give only so much information but it was enough to kindle curiosity

The teens at the Young Writers’ Club were curious and somewhat puzzled looking at the picture, until we opened the complete article. The title “Lizzo Plays New Notes from James Madison’s Crystal Flute from 1813,” followed by the sub text gave us more information but that made us even more curious.

“Who is James Madison?”

“What is so special about his crystal flute that to from 1813?”

“What led to the decision to play an old flute that could be extremely brittle.”

“Wouldn’t it have dust?”

“Why make a big deal? Could it be a marketing technique to motivate people to come to see it on display?”

The event happened and we read about it much later. We talked, we wondered, we questioned and felt rather satisfied having read about an iconic event such as this one.


Written text helps convey plenty of information at a later point in time and possibly for eternity if kept safe. It also needs to follow writing conventions to help the reader to absorb the content with ease. It is a critical skill that can be developed through writing for a variety of applications, numerous drafts and seeking feedback. It is an important communication skill that comes in use through out one’s life.
 

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Both weekday and weekend batches are available at the Young Readers' Club. While this program is for the 8-11 age group, the Young Writers' Club program for the 12-14 age group offers a weekly platform to read and discuss curated articles from the news, observe writing approaches and practices one's writing skills.

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